The University of Arizona
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-018-0040-0
Helping to Solve the 9 Billion-People Question
Institute Profile
The Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) was formed in 2002 when Dr. Rod A. Wing joined the School of Plant Sciences at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The primary focus of AGI is in the area of structural, evolutionary and functional genomics of crop plants where it has played significant roles in over 30 plant and animal genome projects. AGI is divided into 4 Centers each lead by a Center Leader (BAC/EST Library Construction & Resource Center, Sequencing & Physical Mapping Center [including: production sequencing and fingerprinting, and sequence finishing], Bioinformatics Center, and the Evolutionary and Functional Genomics Center). AGI is housed in the state of the art Thomas W. Keating Bioresearch Building on the northeast part of the UA campus near the Arizona Health Science Center. AGI currently employees about 10 scientists and is primarily funded through federal grants, private contracts, and the Bud Antle Endowed Chair in Plant Molecular Genetics.
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AGI is an Approved PacBio Certified Service Provider

The Arizona Genomics Institute recently acquired a Pacific Biosciences Sequel state-of-the-art long-read sequencing instrument that is now available for service project sequencing. AGI has developed robust pipelines for sequencing whole genomes, transcriptomes and BAC clones. Pacbio sequencing uses Single Molecule Real Time sequencing of large templates to produce extremely long reads.
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BAC/EST Resources Available for Distribution
Libraries: 365
Clones: 15,083,328
How can we solve world hunger with rice?
Recent News
As Asians get rich and healthy, 'smart crops' replace rice on future menus Posted by webmaster
By Rina Chandran

http://news.trust.org/item/20180521010006-gv8pt

TAIPEI, May 21 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Lunchtime in Taipei's Ximending district is a test of wills and patience as tourists and locals jostle at restaurants and street stalls to choose from steamed and fried dumplings, flat and thin noodles, stuffed pancakes, grills and desserts.

In this foodie haven, one item makes only an occasional appearance on menus and on plates - rice.

Once a staple of Taiwanese diets, rice consumption per person has fallen more than two-thirds in 50 years, according to the United Nations' Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), as "smart crops" and "super foods" muscle their way onto plates.

It is the steepest drop in Asia but a trend across the continent as urbanisation, rising incomes, climate change and concerns about health and food supplies drive a push for alternatives for the future such as millets and more protein.

"I ate a lot of rice when I was younger but now I eat more vegetables, fish and meat. It's healthier," said Guan-Po Lin, 24, who moved to Taipei for university.

"People are spending more on food, and they want to eat healthy, and rice is not seen as a healthy choice."

About 90 percent of global rice production and consumption is in Asia, home to 60 percent of the world's population.

Yet, as trends in Taiwan, Japan, South Korea and Hong Kong show, consumption is set to drop significantly as diets change.

Per capita consumption has fallen about 60 percent in Hong Kong since 1961, and by almost half in Japan. In South Korea, it has slid 41 percent since 1978, FAO data showed.

Alongside that the consumption of fish, meat, dairy, fruits and vegetables has risen significantly.

Rice will still be the single most important crop in the region, key in diets and a symbol of Asian culture, but it will not be as dominant in coming years as new foods are snapped up, said David Dawe, a senior economist at the FAO in Bangkok.

"It is the future for Asia - well-nourished people who can perform better. You cannot get that by filling up on rice; you need more fish, meat, fruits and vegetables," he said.


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A portion of AGI's material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 102620.